Irish Wedding Traditions you can make your own

Whether you are getting married in Tipperary, Kilkenny, Cork or Galway, this overview of Irish wedding traditions could be just what you’re looking for to add something special to your big day.

Money for Luck

In Ireland it is a long-standing tradition to present each other with coins on the day of the wedding. These coins symbolise luck and prosperity for the new bride and groom. For those of you who have a religious faith, it can be a nice touch to get the coins blessed by the priest saying the mass.

Wedding Traditions In Kilkenny
The Irish Horseshoe

The horseshoe is one of Irelands oldest wedding traditions and can be displayed at your home, at the ceremony or in another location of your choice. Be aware that the horseshoe should be displayed pointing upwards (like the letter U) to symbolise that your luck will never run out during your married life.

Tying the Knot – Handfasting

No doubt you are familiar with the term ‘tying the knot’! This ancient reference comes from the act of Handfasting, which was originally practiced in Celtic regions across the globe. Handfasting involves the couple holding hands, right hand to right hand and left hand to left hand. The joined hands are then bound with the Handfasting ribbon to symbolise their union. A beautiful old tradition, which seems to be going through somewhat of a revival.

The Blue Bride

Believe it or not, it is Irish tradition that the bride dresses in blue, not the white we most associate with weddings in Ireland today. In ancient Irish folklore, blue symbolised purity and was therefore the colour of choice for brides across the country. Thinking of adding a little ‘blue’ to your own wedding? Why not accent your bridal party outfits with shades of marines or dusky blues if you’re not quite sure about wearing blue yourself on the big day.

The Wedding Harpist

Even today a lot of brides and grooms will book a harpist to play either at their wedding ceremony or for their guests upon arrival at the reception venue. The harpist has a deep-rooted history of playing for Irish weddings and we are delighted that this tradition has lasted throughout the centuries.

Tying The Knot A Tipperary Wedding Tradition
The Magic Hanky

A thoughtfully embroidered handkerchief thought to symbolise fertility for the married couples future. The magic hanky should be incorporated into the bride’s outfit for the day in some way. Here are some ways in which you can do that:

Use the hanky as a garter

Wrap your bouquet stems in the hanky
Have the hanky stitched to the inside of your dress.
Make it part of your hairpiece.

Ancient stories tell us that once the ceremony is over, the bride should store the magic hanky in a safe place until the couple’s first-born child arrives and should then fashion a bonnet for the baby from the magic material. Such a lovely way to share your big day with your child!

Well we certainly learned a lot when we started researching these old Irish wedding traditions and we hope that you have found the information insightful and inspiring. What better way to keep our Irish traditions alive and well than by making them a part of your very own big day!

Should you require the services of a professional videographer for your wedding in Kilkenny, Tipperary or any other county, please feel free to get in touch with Eamon here at Drangan Video, who is always on hand to answer any questions you may have.

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